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Category: Theology (Exegetical Historical Practical etc.)

Theology (Exegetical Historical Practical etc.)

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  • Personal Narrative Of Jonathan Edwards And His 70 Resolutions (Unabridged)

    $5.98

    This audiobook details some of the most important writings in the life of Jonathan Edwards. His personal conversion story is intense as he describes the sense of glory that permeated his soul. Edwards also details his January 1723 dedication in which he offered all of himself without restriction or regard to his own life. The 70 resolutions of Jonathan Edwards were written over a year time period, and Edwards read them on a weekly basis. Continue Reading Personal Narrative Of Jonathan Edwards And His 70 Resolutions (Unabridged)

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  • Heretics (Unabridged)

    $21.98

    Nothing more strangely indicates an enormous and silent evil of modern society than the extraordinary use which is made nowadays of the word orthodox. In former days the heretic was proud of not being a heretic. It was the kingdoms of the world and the police and the judges who were heretics. He was orthodox. He had no pride in having rebelled against them; they had rebelled against him. The armies with their cruel security, the kings with their cold faces, the decorous processes of State, the reasonable processes of law–all these like sheep had gone astray. The man was proud of being orthodox, was proud of being right. If he stood alone in a howling wilderness he was more than a man; he was a church. He was the centre of the universe; it was round him that the stars swung. All the tortures torn out of forgotten hells could not make him admit that he was heretical. But a few modern phrases have made him boast of it. He says, with a conscious laugh, I suppose I am very heretical, and looks round for applause. The word heresy not only means no longer being wrong; it practically means being clear-headed and courageous. The word orthodoxy not only no longer means being right; it practically means being wrong. All this can mean one thing, and one thing only. It means that people care less for whether they are philosophically right. For obviously a man ought to confess himself crazy before he confesses himself heretical. The Bohemian, with a red tie, ought to pique himself on his orthodoxy. The dynamiter, laying a bomb, ought to feel that, whatever else he is, at least he is orthodox. — Gilbert K. Chesterson Continue Reading Heretics (Unabridged)

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  • Everlasting Man (Unabridged)

    $24.98

    Here is the book that converted C. S. Lewis from atheism to Christianity. This history of mankind, Christ, and Christianity is to some extent a conscious rebuttal of H. G. Wells’ Outline of History, which embraced both the evolutionary origins of humanity and the mortal humanity of Jesus. Whereas Orthodoxy detailed Chesterton’s own spiritual journey, this book illustrates the spiritual journey of humanity, or at least of Western civilization. A book for both mind and spirit. Continue Reading Everlasting Man (Unabridged)

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  • Knowing God

    $24.98

    A lifelong pursuit of knowing God should embody the Christian’s existence. According to eminent theologian J.I. Packer, however, Christians have become enchanted by modern skepticism and have joined the gigantic conspiracy of misdirection by failing to put first things first. Knowing God aims to redirect our attention to the simple, deep truth that to know God is to love His Word. What began as a number of consecutive articles angled for honest, no-nonsense readers who were fed up with facile Christian verbiage in 1973, Knowing God has become a contemporary classic by creating small studies out of great subjects. Each chapter is so specific in focus (covering topics such as the trinity, election, God’s wrath, and God’s sovereignty), that each succeeding chapter’s theology seems to rival the next, until one’s mind is so expanded that one’s entire view of God has changed. Author Elizabeth Eliot wrote that amid the lofty content Packer puts the hay where the sheep can reach it–plainly shows us ordinary folks what it means to know God. Having rescued us from the individual hunches of our ultra-tolerant theological age, Packer points the reader to the true character of God with his theological competence and compassionate heart. The lazy and faint-hearted should be warned about this timeless work–God is magnified, the sinner is humbled, and the saint encouraged. Continue Reading Knowing God

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